www.MountainHiker.org

Hiking Stats as of 11/14/2018
Total Trips:
Total Distance:
Total Elevation Gain:
 325
 3,891.68 miles
 1,060,050 feet

Jan 29, 2015 - Las Trampas Peak

 

Partners: (None)

Distance: 4.64 miles

Elevation Gain: 1,190 feet

Trip Time: 1:02

Maps and Stats:
48 hours after my brief round up of 3 CC peaks in the East Bay, I once again was scheduled to attend a meeting, this time in Walnut Creek. I had made plans to have lunch with a former co-worker who I had worked with for 10 years prior to his departure. As such, there were no plans for hiking on the day, so I didn't have my GPS or camera, or even a change of clothes. But when my meeting ended a little before 11 AM, I was suddenly staring at 1 1/2 hours of time before the scheduled lunch. What to do? Grab a peak of course!

I pulled up the Peakbagger app and searched for my unclimbed peaks which were nearby. I knew there wouldn't be anything from the CC list, as I had long since cleaned those out in this area, but when I saw Las Trampas Peak on the list I knew I had found my target. I knew I had at least come close to the peak a couple of years ago, in one of the first hikes Kyle and I done together (before I knew about peak lists) and we just wanted to hike a local park. I had not brought a GPS for that hike, and as such had no way to later determine if we had tagged the summit on our long march. I could not remember where the TH was, so using the app I picked out the closed street to the peak and decided to try and just start from that location. I drove to Alamo, exiting at Stone Valley and taking a couple of roads which led to Las Trampas Road. This led west into the hills, and into an environment where a single millionaire need not apply. Better come with a few more dollars to gain entry up here. Unfortunately a gated community lies at the upper reaches of the road, so I had to park off to the side as best I could. As I was doing so a woman walked down from the gated community, a fellow hiker so I asked if I could park at this location. She said she wasn't sure, but offered a suggestion for parking in a slightly different spot (which I did). There is a well marked trail which leads into the hills, but surprisingly after a few minutes it dumped me out back on Las Trampas Road, but above the gate. I was a bit nervous walking along this road, afraid of being questioned as to what I was doing in the gated community, but I didn't see anyone up here. It shouldn't have been an issue but I didn't want to find out.

I followed the road into a court, where another trail picked up. This trail was actually an easement through private property, with many signs asking for hikers to stay on trail. I did so, and after about a mile I finally crossed into Las Trampas Park land. I was in quite the hurry, not knowing how long the hike would be and really not wanting to run out of time so close to the peak. I was probably an odd sight, I had hiking boots, black dockers pants, and a large red t-shirt (and my dorky floppy hat). Thankfully I didn't take any selfies to document this fashion faux-pas. I took to running the flat and even the slightly uphill sections, knowing I had to turn around by 12:05 in order to make the lunch meeting. As such there are very few pictures, just one as I got close to the peak and then some from when I made the summit after 2 1/3 miles and 38 minutes of hiking. The summit views were nice, although somewhat hazy. When I saw the view of the trail following the ridgeline I knew I had been here before, having remembered taking a similar picture on the hike with Kyle. Oh well, at least now I was sure I had summited teh peak. I ran the majority of the way down, arriving back at the road portion of the hike in 17 minutes, and back at the car a mere 23 minutes after summiting. The hike was 4.6 miles with 1200 feet of gain, completed in 1 hour and 2 minutes. I hurried off to the lunch meeting, arriving on-time at the Lazy Dog in Concord, and after dusting myself off and putting back on my collared shirt and sweater and dress shoes, looked none the worse for wear.

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